Highlights

Plants used to treat skin diseases

Cosmetics have a lot of influence on the market, thanks  to the recognition of consumers. There is a great demand for natural products. With mapping supply and demand, MAP-Expo can identify the needs and opportunities in the market. Skin diseases are numerous and a frequently occurring health problem affecting all ages from the neonates to the elderly and cause harm in number of ways. Maintaining healthy skin is important for a healthy body. Many people may develop skin diseases that affect the skin, including cancer, herpes and cellulitis. Some wild plants and their parts are frequently used to treat these diseases. The use of plants is as old as the mankind. Natural treatment is cheap and claimed to be safe.  COMMON SKIN PROBLEMS Skin disease is a common ailment and it affects all ages from the neonate to the elderly and cause harm in number of ways.There are more than a thousand conditions that may affect the skin but most skin diseases can be categorized into nine common types. Rashes A rash is an area of red, inflamed skin or a group of individual spots. These can be caused by irritation, allergy, infection, an underlying disease, as well as by structural defects for example, blocked pores or malfunctioning oil glands. Examples of rashes include acne, dermatitis, eczema, hives, pityriasis rosea and psorasis. Bacterial infections Such infections are caused by a variety of bacteria, the most common types being staphylococci and streptococci. Bacteria may infect the topmost layers of skin, the follicles, or the deeper layers of skin. If not treated correctly, these infections may spread throughout the body. Examples include impel folliculitis, cellulitis and lyme disease. Bacterial infections are better treated with antibiotics. Fungal infections Harmless fungi are always present on surface of the skin. Infection occurs when these organisms enter into the body. These infections are usually superficial, affecting the skin, hair, nails and include athlete's foot, lock itch and ringworm. However, in people with suppressed immune system or who have been taking antibiotics for long period -, the fungi may spread to deep within the body, causing more serious disease. Pigmentation disorders The amount of pigment in the skin is determined by the amount of melanin being produced by the body. Loss of pigment (hypo pigmentation) can be caused by absence of melanocytes, malfunctioning cells, exposure to cold or chemicals, or some types of infection. An increase in pigment (hyperpigmentation) may be caused by skin irritation, hormonal changes, aging, a metabolic disorder, or any other underlying problem. Age spots, freckles and melasma are examples of hyper pigmentation. Vitiligo is an example of hypo pigmentation. HERBAL DRUGS FOR SKIN DISEASES Natural drugs from the plants are gaining popularity because of several advantages such as often having fewer side-effects, better patient tolerance, being relatively less expensive and acceptable due to a long history of use. Besides herbal medicines provide rational means for the treatment of many diseases that are obstinate and incurable in other systems of medicine. For these reasons several plants have been investigated for treatment of skin diseases ranging from itching to skin cancer. So far 31 plants have been reported to be effective in various skin diseases during the past 17 years (1995-2012) of research work, which are mentioned below. Aloe vera (Common name: Barbados aloe; Family: Xanthorrhoeaceae) Aloe vera has shown very good results in skin diseases and it is often taken as health drink. It is also found effective in treating wrinkles, stretch marks and pigmentations. It also seems to be able to speed wound healing by improving blood circulation through the area and preventing cell death around a wound. Camellia sinensis (Common name: Green tea, Chaay; Family: Theaceae) Green tea comes from the tea plant C. sinensis and may play a beneficial role in treatment of skin tumours and cancer. It contains polyphenols, which act as antioxidants in the body. A specific polyphenol in Green tea called epigallocatechin gallate, according to the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, has been reported to prevent the onset of further growth of skin tumor in the body. It can rejuvenate old skin cells to start reproducing again, keeping the skin younger looking. Cannabis sativus (Common name: Charas, Ganja; Family: Cannabinaceae) The powder of the leaves serves as a dressing for wounds and sores. Ganja is externally applied to relieve pain in itchy skin diseases. Hemp seed oil is useful for treatment of eczema and host of other skin diseases like dermatitis, seborrhoeic dermatitis/cradle cap, varicose eczema, psoriasis, lichen planus and acne roseacea. By using hemp seed oil, the skin is strengthened and made better able to resist bacterial, viral and fungal infections. Crushed leaves are rubbed on the affected areas to control scabies. Mirabilis jalapa (Common name: Four o’clock flower, Marvel of Peru; Family: Nctaginaceae) jalapais used traditionally in allergic skin disorders and asthma. A study, employing ethanol: acetone (1:1) extract of the roots of M. jalapa, revealed that the extract (0.5 mL of 100 mg mL[-1]) inhibited histamine-induced guinea pig tracheal chain contractions non-competitively. The extract (100 or 200 mg kg[-1] i.p.) inhibited milk-induced eosinophilia, albumin-induced paw edema and protected mast cells against clonidine-induced granulation justifying the folkloric use of M. jalapain the treatment of allergic diseases and asthma. CONCLUSION Herbals have great potential to cure different kinds of skin diseases. More than 80% of people in India depend on traditional health care and use different plant based products for curing skin related problems. Compared with the conventional allopathic drugs, they have relatively low cost and can be of great benefit to the population of India in general and poor people in particular. Herbals are a rich source of active ingredients and can be safer and cost effective treatment for skin diseases ranging from rashes to dreadful skin cancer. More than 50% of plant species useful for treatment of skin diseases appear to be restricted to forests, so activities such as deforestation, habitat destruction, urbanization etc., may pose a serious threat to these species. Conservation of these plants with the help of local participation and carrying out of extensive research in this respect to broaden the prospects of herbal drugs in skin disease treatment is the need of the hour. Source (see full article): www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3931201/ Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Pharmacology Division, University of Kashmir, Hazaratbal, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India Address for correspondence: Prof. Nahida Tabassum, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Pharmacology Division, University of Kashmir, Hazratbal, Srinagar - 190 006, Jammu and Kashmir, India. E-mail: moc.liamg@ku.mussabat.n  

Partnership announcement – Nova Institute

We are pleased to announce the continuation of our partnership with Nova-Institute. Last edition, the partnership was proved successful. The nova-Institute was founded as a private and independent institute in 1994. It is located in the Chemical Park Knapsack in Huerth, which lies at the heart of the chemical industry around Cologne (Germany). For the last two decades, nova-Institute has been globally active in feedstock supply, techno-economic and environmental evaluation, market research, dissemination, project management and policy for a sustainable bio-based economy. Today, nova-Institute has 25 employees and an annual turnover of more than 2 million euro. Nova-Institute surrounds, strengthens and completes scientific and engineering work by linking it to feedstock, markets, economy and policy. Furthermore, nova is committed to do dissemination and marketing support. Key activities: Raw Material Supply ; Techno-Economic Evaluation; Market Research, Environmental Evaluation, Dissemination & Marketing Support, Political Framework & Strategy, nova-Institute is a member of various international associations and committees. We are founding member of the Cluster Industrial Biotechnology CLIB2021, member of the Federation of Reinforced Plastics (AVK), the subgroup "Natural Fibres Reinforced Plastics", member of the Biobased Industries Consortium BIC, member of kunstoffland NRW e.V. – Plastics Manufacturers Association in the German State of North Rhine-Westphalia and of IBB – Industrielle Biotechnologie Bayern. nova-Institute is the executive office of the European Industrial Hemp Association (EIHA), is member of the Technical Committee, CEN/TC 411 "Bio-based products", of the "Expert Group on Bio-based Products" of the European Commission, member of the Thematic Working Groups "Biomass supply" and "Market-making" of the "Bioeconomy Panel" of the European Commission, as well as member of the Standing Committee on Agricultural Research (SCAR), working group "Sustainable Bioresources for a Growing Bioeconomy".  Thanks to this partnership, MAP EXPO offers you accessibility to knowledge about global demands and trends in the MAP-sector.        

Medicinal and Aromatic Plant Research in the 21st Century

Thanks to the huge potential in the Medicinal and Aromatic plant industry, MAP Expo offers the opportunity to enhance and integrate links in the supply chain. Through our matchmaking program, companies can find the - for them - most relevant buyers and suppliers. The use of medicinal plants is as old the history of manhood. Archaeological sites show plants for healing purposes as for example the Lascaux caves in France, which are between 15,000 and 27,000 years old . Even more, the history of herbal medicine seems to have its very first roots in the animal kingdom. Fascinating evidence exists for self-medication among non-human primates. Chimpanzees, bonobos and gorillas swallow specific leaves and chew bitter piths, if they suffer from parasite infections. It has been speculated that ancient shamans and healers learned from apes by observing them while they were taking medicinal plants. These plants were then taken by local human populations for medical purposes . The ancient knowledge on the beneficial activity of some plants was a privilege of shamans and healers and give reason to establish traditional medicines worldwide. While many forms of traditional medicines were handed down orally from generation to generation for millennia , complex forms with written textbooks and education systems also developed, e.g. in traditional Chinese medicine, Japanese Kampo medicine, or Ayurveda. (more…)

8 popular medicinal plants you must know about

In an era of advanced medical science and pills, not many people have put their faith on Ayurveda. The ancient medical science has looked after mankind for centuries. Hence, it is definitely worth a shot. Many think that medicinal plants are hard to find and can only be found in far-off forests or mountains. The advent of chemically synthesized drugs made the home pharmacy disappear with time. The knowledge of common remedies for minor ailments also nosedived. However, thanks to globalisation and the help of Internet, more and more people are getting inclined towards Ayurveda. Research facilities across the world are trying their best to analyse the characteristics of easily available plants and find remedies for more critical diseases from their extracts. This is now being termed as the renaissance of herbal medicine. Much about this resurfacing is dependent on self-education of every individual. (more…)

Medicinal and aromatic plants trade programme

Human well-being in both rural and urban areas depends on a diverse array of wild plant products from an even more diverse array of wild plant species. This includes species used for their medicinal and aromatic properties. An estimated 50,000–70,000 medicinal and aromatic species are harvested from the wild, with the annual global export value of pharmaceutical plants alone being over USD2.2 billion in 2011. Use and trade of these plant-based pharmaceuticals and “botanicals”, as medicinal and aromatic plants are sometimes called, underpin both traditional and “modern” healthcare systems. These plants also flavour our food and drinks, perfume and give colour to beauty products and provide incense used by many religious traditions. Although accurate data are lacking, available information indicates that trade is increasing.   (more…)

Natural products derived from plants as a source of drugs

Nature, the master of craftsman of molecules created almost an inexhaustible array of molecular entities. It stands as an infinite resource for drug development, novel chemotypes and pharmacophores, and scaffolds for amplification into efficacious drugs for a multitude of disease indications and other valuable bioactive agents. Since time immemorial, natural products have been the backbone of traditional system of healing throughout the globe, and have also been an integral part of history and culture. Although the use of bioactive natural products as herbal drug preparations dates back hundreds, even thousands, of years ago, their application as isolated and characterized compounds to modern drug discovery and development started only in the 19th century. (more…)

Ayurvedic Medicine: In Depth

Ayurvedic medicine (also called Ayurveda) is one of the world’s oldest medical systems. It originated in India more than 3,000 years ago and remains one of the country’s traditional health care systems. Its concepts about health and disease promote the use of herbal compounds, special diets, and other unique health practices. India’s government and other institutes throughout the world support clinical and laboratory research on Ayurvedic medicine, within the context of the Eastern belief system. But Ayurvedic medicine isn’t widely studied as part of conventional (Western) medicine. This fact sheet provides a general overview of Ayurvedic medicine and suggests sources for additional information (more…)

“Horchata” drink in Southern Ecuador: medicinal plants and people’s wellbeing

Background The “horchata” is a herbal mixture infusion consumed in Southern Ecuador. It remains unknown how vendors group the plant species to sell them at traditional markets. This research documented the following: 1) a list of medicinal plant species sold for the drink; 2) the culturally important medicinal plant species; 3) the agreement among vendors regarding the medicinal plants species and their therapeutic use; and 4) the groups of medicinal plants sold for the preparation of “horchata.” (more…)

Culture, History and Applications of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants in Japan

Aromatic and medicinal plants fill a significant role in human societies that have helped improve the lives of people since ancient times. Ancient people became aware of the value and attractiveness of aromatic and medicinal plants, and the significance of historical books is a guide for the use of the plant material. Initial books on use on medicinal and aromatic plants were sourced in various parts of the world, such as the Middle East, Greece, China, and India, indicating that these ancient civilizations used indigenous aromatic and medicinal plants to improve lives in their own separate ways before ideas were shared. Japan is no exception; names of some local aromatic and medicinal plants were recorded in the oldest Japanese history book “Kojiki” written in 712 A.D. Aromatic and medicinal plants, however, continue to influence human life, culture, and history. Currently, an estimated 70,000 plant species are used in traditional medicine. (more…)

Impact of climate change on Medicinal and aromatic plants: Review

There has been worldwide changes in seasonal patterns, weather events, temperature ranges, and other related phenomena and all have been analyzed in partial, reported and attributed to global climate change. The negative impacts of climate change will become much more intense and frequent in the future—particularly if environmentally destructive human activities continue unabated, warned categorically by a number of experts in a wide range of scientific disciplines and interests. (more…)